Publication Date 01/07/2014         Volume. 6 No. 6   
Information to Pharmacists

Editorial

From the desk of the editor

Welcome to the July 2014 homepage edition of i2P (Information to Pharmacists) E-Magazine.
At the commencement of 2014 i2P focused on the need for the entire profession of pharmacy and its associated industry supports to undergo a renewal and regeneration.
We are now half-way through this year and it is quite apparent that pharmacy leaders do not yet have a cohesive and clear sense of direction.
Maybe the new initiative by Woolworths to deliver clinical service through young pharmacists and nurses may sharpen their focus.
If not, community pharmacy can look forward to losing a substantial and profitable market share of the clinical services market.
Who would you blame when that happens?
But I have to admit there is some effort, even though the results are but meagre.
In this edition of i2P we focus on the need for research about community pharmacy, the lack of activity from practicing pharmacists and when some research is delivered, a disconnect appears in its interpretation and implementation.

read more
open full screen

Recent Comments

Click here to read...

Patients Don't Understand Health Information

Staff Writer

articles by this author...

Editing and Researching news and stories about global and local Pharmacy Issues

Nearly 50 percent of patients have difficulty understanding health information.
Confusing medical directions, such as word choice, dosage and timing of prescription medicine, can lead to serious consequences including health setbacks, inappropriate hospital admissions and sometimes, death.

Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Health Professions have examined a rehabilitation facility and an independent senior-living facility to see what health care facilities can do to increase patient understanding and positive outcomes.

At the independent living facility, paperwork was written at a college-sophomore reading level. Previous studies have recommended that medical information be written at a fifth to eighth-grade reading level.

Another common health literacy issue is clear oral communication between health care professionals and patients. At the rehabilitation facility, health care professionals rarely asked patients if they were "being clear".

Problems with oral communication also extend to a lack of availability of multilingual employees who can translate for providers. Following the evaluation, the researchers gave suggestions to each facility.

Researchers recommend several steps that the health care industry can take to increase patient understanding:

* Health care professionals should use plain language, instead of professional jargon, as well as make sure a patient understands their directions.
* Printed materials should be available in large, easy-to-read fonts and written at a fifth to eighth grade level.
* Clear maps and consistent navigational signs should be posted throughout the interior, as well as on the exterior of the building.
* Wheelchair accessibility also should be a consideration beyond mobility. For example, maps should be posted at wheelchair-level.

Researchers are working to educate current and future health care professionals on the importance of patient understanding by speaking at professional conferences and advocating curriculum changes.

The study was published in the journal Occupational Therapy in Health Care.

Older Americans need help with end of life medical care
One in four elderly Americans require someone else to make decisions about their medical care at the end of their lives, according to a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The results illustrate the value of people making their wishes known in a living will and designating someone to make treatment decisions for them, the researchers said.

The Associated Press reported that in the study, those who spelled out their preferences in living wills usually got the treatment they wanted. Only a few wanted heroic measures to prolong their lives.

The researchers said it's the first accounting of how many of the elderly really end up needing medical decisions made for them.

Return to home

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

More information about formatting options

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a genuine visitor, to prevent automated spam submissions.
Incorrect please try again
Enter the words above: Enter the numbers you hear:
  • Copyright (C) 2000-2014 Computachem Services, All Rights Reserved.

Website by Ablecode