Publication Date 01/07/2014         Volume. 6 No. 6   
Information to Pharmacists

Editorial

From the desk of the editor

Welcome to the July 2014 homepage edition of i2P (Information to Pharmacists) E-Magazine.
At the commencement of 2014 i2P focused on the need for the entire profession of pharmacy and its associated industry supports to undergo a renewal and regeneration.
We are now half-way through this year and it is quite apparent that pharmacy leaders do not yet have a cohesive and clear sense of direction.
Maybe the new initiative by Woolworths to deliver clinical service through young pharmacists and nurses may sharpen their focus.
If not, community pharmacy can look forward to losing a substantial and profitable market share of the clinical services market.
Who would you blame when that happens?
But I have to admit there is some effort, even though the results are but meagre.
In this edition of i2P we focus on the need for research about community pharmacy, the lack of activity from practicing pharmacists and when some research is delivered, a disconnect appears in its interpretation and implementation.

read more
open full screen

Recent Comments

Click here to read...

New survival factor for immune cells identified

Staff Researcher

articles by this author...

Editing and Researching news and stories about Australian and International Pharmacy Issues

Ms Eleonora Ottina and Dr Marco Herold have identified a survival factor for immune cells
An international team of researchers has discovered that many of the body’s infection-fighting immune cells require a cell survival protein, called A1, to develop and function. Their finding could lead to a better understanding of conditions including leukaemia, allergy and autoimmunity.
The team discovered that without A1, immune cells called lymphocytes and granulocytes could not develop, or could not respond appropriately to infectious stimuli.

A1 is part of the Bcl-2 protein family, which controls the survival of cells. The research team developed a method of depleting A1 from immune cells, allowing them to study the development and function of immune cells lacking A1. The findings were published online last month in the journal Blood.

The research was jointly led by Dr Marco Herold, from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute’s Molecular Genetics of Cancer division, and Dr Andreas Villunger of Innsbruck Medical University, Austria, a former postdoctoral researcher at the institute. Dr Herold, who began the research while at the University of Wuerzburg, Germany, said the discovery had surprised many scientists working in the area. “For more than a decade, we have known that cell survival proteins such as Bcl-2 are important for immune cell development and function,” he said. “A1 proved more difficult to work with than other, closely related, proteins so many researchers ignored it. Our work has shown that A1 has many important roles in the immune system.”

Ms Eleonora Ottina, a student visiting the institute from the Molecular Cell Biology and Oncology post-graduate program at Innsbruck Medical University, said the discovery had opened the door to several new fields of research into human disease. “It is well known that conditions including leukaemia, allergy, and autoimmune conditions, such as lupus, can be caused by the survival of defective or unwanted immune cells, which should normally die,” she said.

“Our research has shown that A1 is important for immune cell development and survival, and has given us the tools to deplete cells of A1 protein. We are now working to determine whether the presence of A1 in cells is necessary for the development of leukaemia, autoimmunity or allergy. If it is, depleting or functionally blocking A1 could be a new treatment for these diseases.”

The research was funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF), the Tiroler Krebshilfe and the German Research Council.

 

Return to home

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

More information about formatting options

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a genuine visitor, to prevent automated spam submissions.
Incorrect please try again
Enter the words above: Enter the numbers you hear:

Clinical Newsfeed

health news headlines provided courtesy of Medical News Today.

Click here to read more...

If any difficulty is found in subscribing, please use the "Contact Us" panel found in the navigation bar with the message "subscribe" and your email address.

Subscribe to our mailing list

Email Format
 

 

  • Copyright (C) 2000-2014 Computachem Services, All Rights Reserved.

Website by Ablecode