Publication Date 01/10/2011         Volume. 3 No. 9   
Information to Pharmacists

Editorial

From the desk of the editor

Welcome to the October 2011 homepage dition of i2P-Information to Pharmacists.
Well, the month just finished did so with a bang as the Blackmore's/Pharmacy Guild proposed alliance hit the fan.
And what a mess!
To such an extent that many of the articles for this month touch on the qualities of leadership and the ethics of pharmacy promotions, how we are connected as pharmacists and how we all become tainted when one segment of pharmacy does something that goes wrong-and we all have to share the collective blame whether we like it or not.

read more
open full screen

Recent Comments

Click here to read...

A new approach to cancer treatment

Staff Writer

articles by this author...

Editing and Researching news and stories about global and local Pharmacy Issues

Scientists have discovered a mechanism that causes an aggressive type of lung cancer to re-grow following chemotherapy, offering hope for new therapies.
The study, conducted by an international team of researchers from Monash, Stanford and John Hopkins universities, represents not just the potential for new drugs, but a novel way of approaching cancer treatment.
Professor Neil Watkins, of the Monash Institute of Medical Research (MIMR) led the Monash research team of Dr Luciano Martelotto, MIMR, and Associate Professor Tracey Brown of the Department of Biochemisty and Molecular Biology

open this article full screen

Professor Watkins said while many current cancer treatments and trials focus on shrinking existing tumours, this research had a different focus.

"Some aggressive types of cancer respond very well to chemotherapy, but then the real challenge is to stop the tumour coming back. That's what we investigated. 

Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death in Australia. Between 15 and 20 per cent of lung cancer cases are an extremely aggressive type known as small cell lung cancer (SCLC) that usually responds well to chemotherapy, but regrows and is then less responsive to the treatment.

The study showed that the regrowth of SCLC cells could be blocked by a drug that targets growth signals, which, in healthy cells, control organ development and repair.

Professor Watkins said that blocking the signalling pathway, known as 'Hedgehog', could form the basis of new SCLC treatments.

"This discovery gives us important clues for designing new treatment approaches. By using drugs to inhibit the Hedgehog signalling, we should be able to increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy and reduce the risk of cancer relapse," said Professor Watkins

The latest study will feed into and change the focus of trials already being conducted at the Monash Medical Centre, located next to MIMR.

Dr Vinod Ganju, a medical oncologist at the Monash Cancer Centre, said conventional trials, focusing on tumour shrinkage, would not be useful in realising the potential of blocking the Hedgehog pathway.

"Based on this research, we need to change our approach. We will re-design our clinical trials to test how these new therapies can improve patient outcomes following chemotherapy," said Dr Ganju.

"Our relationship with MIMR means we can make this happen relatively quickly and take immediate advantage of this research breakthrough."

The study, supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Victorian Cancer Agency, was published today in the prestigious journal, Nature Medicine

Return to home

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

More information about formatting options

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a genuine visitor, to prevent automated spam submissions.
Incorrect please try again
Enter the words above: Enter the numbers you hear:

Clinical Newsfeed

health news headlines provided courtesy of Medical News Today.

Click here to read more...

If any difficulty is found in subscribing, please use the "Contact Us" panel found in the navigation bar with the message "subscribe" and your email address.

Subscribe to our mailing list

Email Format
 

 

  • Copyright (C) 2000-2014 Computachem Services, All Rights Reserved.

Website by Ablecode